Dotty Bag Lady - What's In My Handbag

January 12, 2015

I may not yet be worthy of the accolade of 'bag lady' but if there is one thing I love it is a classic handbag with a twist - an artist collaboration.

Whether it's James Gillary on an Anya Hindmarch tote or Julie Verhoeven's illustrations on a M.A.C palette there is nothing so pleasing to me as a marriage between art and fashion (although if they are somewhat related, is this like marrying your cousin? Eh). Louis Vuitton is no stranger to this concept, having flirted with the likes of artists Murakami, Verhoeven, and Sprouse but to name a few. Of all the artist Louis Vuitton have teamed up with, my favourite collaboration yet has to be the Yayoi Kusama and Louis Vuitton collaboration of Summer 2012. I have two handbags from this collection - which I don't think I've ever shared on Posh, Broke, & Bored - one of which is my current go-to day bag so I thought I'd do a blog post about it, tell you a little more of one of my favourite artists, and show you what's in my handbag.





I've always loved the shape of the Louis Vuitton Neverfull, as much as I find the thin straps don't distribute the immense weight of my camera and other gadgets as well as I like. Perhaps the shape is better suited to carrying lighter objects like jumpers, scarfs, and the sort - but somehow this Yayoi Kusama edition has never strained my shoulders as much as other Neverfull variants have. I do love the Neverfull though for the many print versions it comes in - I have at least four - perhaps it's the collector in me that likes having many of the same thing, but different. 





The Louis Vuitton Yayoi Kusama was a limited edition from two years ago and has mostly sold out but you can still find a few popping up for resale here and there -


A bit of background on the dotty (sorry, I couldn't help it) artist behind her famous patterns - 

At 10 years of age, this virtuous Japanese artist from Matsumoto – also known as the Priestess of Polka Dots – started painting her renowned dots and webs as a result of her visual and auditory hallucinations caused by experiences that terrified her. Through art, she found a way of calming her obsessive and depressive feelings. This motif has remained a central feature of her work, and expresses her feeling of revolving 'in the infinity of endless time and the absoluteness of space,' and her view of herself as 'a dot lost among a million other dots.' Sources (1, 2)
"My artwork is an expression of my life, particularly of my mental disease... My art originates from hallucinations only I can see. I translate the hallucinations and obsessional images that plague me into sculptures and paintings." 
Her first artworks were based on obsessive repetition of circular forms that she accumulated in great canvases, creating rhythmic patters. In 1957, during the boom of pop art and everything psychedelic, she moved to New York where she met Andy Warhol, Donald Judd, Claes Oldenburg and Joseph Cornell. During this period, she expressed herself more freely through new spaces: she experimented with peculiar designs on soft sculptures and surprised the entire world with her radical performances and happenings. In 1973, she checked herself into the Seiwa Hospital for the Mentally Ill by choice and has been living there ever since. (Source)
“A polka-dot has the form of the sun, which is a symbol of the energy of the whole world and our living life, and also the form of the moon, which is calm. Round, soft, colorful, senseless and unknowing. 
Polka dots become movement…Polka dots are a way to infinity.”  
I first came to know about Kusama-sensei's work in 2009, when I was confronted by her polka dot mushrooms on the roof of the Hayward Gallery. Fast forward to three years later, in 2012, and Kusama-sensei's iconic work popped up again at the Tate Modern. Completely enamoured by the dots - you could say I was seeing spots - I was thrilled when soon after her collaboration with Louis Vuitton made its debut. The rest, as they say, is history - I went completely dotty and snapped up what I could from my favourite French luggage brand.

I like to collect artist collaboration fashion pieces as an affordable way to get into art, and also it serves double duty - display it on my shelves or on my arm? What a wonderful conundrum. Do you, like me, like your art where everyone can see it (on your person)? Are there any other artist and fashion collaborations that you think I would like and should know about? Let me know. x

13 comments:

  1. The problem with my never full is that it's always full... mostly of stuff i absolutely don't need to carry around with me!

    xx Kate

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    1. Whaaaat? Your Neverfull is Always Full? I think you need to write to Louis Vuitton and ask them to design a special bag for you - bespoke, baby! ;) x

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  2. So much love for Yayoi! This collaboration was one of LV's best. I even remember when it was released and who I was with when I went to the store. That's how much I love this collection.

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    1. Wow, that's some amazing memory power and a serious first impression Kusama-sensei and Louis Vuitton made on you! x

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  3. That bag is gorgeous and I love the background of the artist. Such a fab way of creating a bit more interest around a simple 'What's in my bag' post. Unfortunately, it's going to be a good few more years before I can start owning beautiful items like this. Lovely post though!

    Katie <3

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    1. Katie! Thank you for your lovely comment. Yes, I was trying to add a bit more 'flesh' to my usual 'look at all the stuffs I carry look at it I saaaaaaaaay *shoves bag*' post - I'm glad you enjoyed it! Let's all start saving for the next amazing artist-fashion collaboration! x

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  4. This was definitely my favourite LV collab too. Super classy and timeless!

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    1. It really is! And it's also art so that's two purchases in one ;) x

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  5. Great post, I love the photographs :) I love your blog and if you ever get a chance to check out mine I would be delighted, thanks!

    Camille xo

    www.cococami.blogspot.co.uk

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    1. Oooh I'm going to check out your blog now, thank you for sharing! x

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  6. Great bag! Can I borrow it? lol
    I love Yayoi Kusama's work, the exhibition at the Tate was breathtaking!

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    1. Of course you can - anything for you! x

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  7. Great post Jasiminne, and you brought me right back to that exhibition at the Tate, which I loved so much I went to see it three times with different friends (and Rob of course!) I did have the Tate Unlimited card that year, as I was translating and working from the top floor Member's Cafe, good memories :)

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